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Archive for May, 2013|Monthly archive page

Should I Really Join Facebook?

In Uncategorized on May 31, 2013 at 3:39 am
Should I Really Join Facebook?

A good laugh for people in our age group!!
When I bought my Blackberry, I thought about the 30-year business I ran with 1800 employees, all without a cell phone that plays music, takes videos, pictures and communicates with Facebook and Twitter. I signed up under duress for Twitter and Facebook, so my seven kids, their spouses, 13 grand kids and 2 great grand kids could communicate with me in the modern way. I figured I could handle something as simple as Twitter with only 140 characters of space.

That was before one of my grandkids hooked me up for Tweeter, Tweetree, Twhirl, Twitterfon, Tweetie and Twittererific Tweetdeck, Twitpix and something that sends every message to my cell phone and every other program within the texting world.

My phone was beeping every three minutes with the details of everything except the bowel movements of the entire next generation. I am not ready to live like this. I keep my cell phone in the garage … in my golf bag.

The kids bought me a GPS for my last birthday because they say I get lost every now and then going over to the grocery store or library. I keep that in a box under my tool bench with the Blue tooth [it’s red] phone I am supposed to use when I drive. I wore it once and was standing in line at Barnes and Noble talking to my wife and everyone in the nearest 50 yards was glaring at me. I had to take my hearing aid out to use it, and I got a little loud.

I mean the GPS looked pretty smart on my dash board, but the lady inside that gadget was the most annoying, rudest person I had run into in a long time. Every 10 minutes, she would sarcastically say, “Re-calc-u-lating.” You would think that she could be nicer. It was like she could barely tolerate me. She would let go with a deep sigh and then tell me to make a U-turn at the next light. Then if I made a right turn instead … well, it was not a good relationship.

When I get really lost now, I call my wife and tell her the name of the cross streets and while she is starting to develop the same tone as Gypsy, the GPS lady, at least she loves me.

To be perfectly frank, I am still trying to learn how to use the cordless phones in our house. We have had them for 4 years, but I still haven’t figured out how I can lose three phones all at once and have to run around digging under chair cushions and checking bathrooms and the dirty laundry baskets when the phone rings.

The world is just getting too complex for me. They even mess me up every time I go to the grocery store. You would think they could settle on something themselves but this sudden “Paper or Plastic?” every time I check out just knocks me for a loop. I bought some of those cloth reusable bags to avoid looking confused, but I never remember to take them in with me.

Now I toss it back to them. When they ask me, “Paper or Plastic?” I just say, “Doesn’t matter to me. I am bi-sacksual.” Then it’s their turn to stare at me with a blank look. I was recently asked if I tweet. I answered, “No, but I do toot a lot.”

P.S. I know some of you are not over 50. I sent it to you to allow you to forward it to those who are.

We senior citizens don’t need any more gadgets. The TV remote and the garage door remote are about all we can handle.

The Iranian Sex Trade

In Uncategorized on May 31, 2013 at 3:32 am

The Iranian Sex Trade

The Iranian Sex Trade

Donna M. Hughes, a professor in the Women’s Studies Program at the University of Rhode Island, highlighted some frightening aspects of the Iranian regime in Islamic Fundamentalism and the Sex Slave Trade in Iran.

Professor Hughes begins:

A measure of Islamic fundamentalists’ success in controlling society is the depth and totality with which they suppress the freedom and rights of women. In Iran for 25 years, the ruling mullahs have enforced humiliating and sadistic rules and punishments on women and girls, enslaving them in a gender apartheid system of segregation, forced veiling, second-class status, lashing, and stoning to death.

This isn’t news.  This much everyone knows.  But the paper soon delves into details that are not common knowledge:

Joining a global trend, the fundamentalists have added another way to dehumanize women and girls: buying and selling them for prostitution. Exact numbers of victims are impossible to obtain, but according to an official source in Tehran, there has been a 635 percent increase in the number of teenage girls in prostitution. The magnitude of this statistic conveys how rapidly this form of abuse has grown. In Tehran, there are an estimated 84,000 women and girls in prostitution, many of them are on the streets, others are in the 250 brothels that reportedly operate in the city. The trade is also international: thousands of Iranian women and girls have been sold into sexual slavery abroad.

But surely the totalitarian Islamist government which monitors and controls every aspect of Iranian life is somehow unaware of these activities going on under their own noses? Well, apparently not:

This criminal trade is not conducted outside the knowledge and participation of the ruling fundamentalists. Government officials themselves are involved in buying, selling, and sexually abusing women and girls.

Given the totalitarian rule in Iran, most organized activities are known to the authorities. The exposure of sex slave networks in Iran has shown that many mullahs and officials are involved in the sexual exploitation and trade of women and girls. Women report that in order to have a judge approve a divorce they have to have sex with him. Women who are arrested for prostitution say they must have sex with the arresting officer. There are reports of police locating young women for sex for the wealthy and powerful mullahs.

In cities, shelters have been set-up to provide assistance for runaways. Officials who run these shelters are often corrupt; they run prostitution rings using the girls from the shelter. For example in Karaj, the former head of a Revolutionary Tribunal and seven other senior officials were arrested in connection with a prostitution ring that used 12 to 18 year old girls from a shelter called the Center of Islamic Orientation.

Other instances of corruption abound. There was a judge in Karaj who was involved in a network that identified young girls to be sold abroad. And in Qom, the center for religious training in Iran, when a prostitution ring was broken up, some of the people arrested were from government agencies, including the Department of Justice.

Not all children are used for prostitution locally. Many are sold overseas:

Popular destinations for victims of the slave trade are the Arab countries in the Persian Gulf. According to the head of the Tehran province judiciary, traffickers target girls between 13 and 17, although there are reports of some girls as young as 8 and 10, to send to Arab countries. One ring was discovered after an 18 year-old girl escaped from a basement where a group of girls were held before being sent to Qatar, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates. The number of Iranian women and girls who are deported from Persian Gulf countries indicates the magnitude of the trade.

Police have uncovered a number of prostitution and slavery rings operating from Tehran that have sold girls to France, Britain, Turkey, as well. One network based in Turkey bought smuggled Iranian women and girls, gave them fake passports, and transported them to European and Persian Gulf countries. In one case, a 16-year-old girl was smuggled to Turkey, and then sold to a 58-year-old European national for $20,000.

In the northeastern Iranian province of Khorasan, local police report that girls are being sold to Pakistani men as sex-slaves. The Pakistani men marry the girls, ranging in age from 12 to 20, and then sell them to brothels called “Kharabat” in Pakistan. One network was caught contacting poor families around Mashad and offering to marry girls. The girls were then taken through Afghanistan to Pakistan where they were sold to brothels.

In the southeastern border province of Sistan Baluchestan, thousands of Iranian girls reportedly have been sold to Afghani men. Their final destinations are unknown.

I know that under the rules of political correctness I am supposed to “celebrate diversity” and learn to “accept” other cultures and value them for their differences — but I am not going to.

http://www.fortliberty.org/the-iranian-sex-trade.html

 

Major Retailers Join Bangladesh Safety Plan

In Uncategorized on May 14, 2013 at 3:47 am
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    Major Retailers Join Bangladesh Safety Plan

    By 
    Published: May 13, 2013

    Three weeks after a building collapse in Bangladesh that killed more than 1,100 workers, several of the world’s largest apparel companies – including the retailing giant H&M and Inditex, owner of the Zara chain — agreed on Monday to sign a far-reaching and legally binding plan that requires retailers to help finance fire safety and building improvements in the factories they use in Bangladesh.

    Consumer and labor groups hailed the move by Sweden-based H&M – which is the largest purchaser of garments from Bangladesh – as an important step toward improving factory safety in Bangladesh, saying it would increase pressure on other Western retailers and apparel brands to do likewise.

    Within hours of H&M’s Monday statement, C&A of the Netherlands and two British retailers, Primark and Tesco, also joined in.

    The factory safety agreement calls for independent, rigorous factory safety inspections with public reports and mandatory repairs and renovations underwritten by Western retailers. A legally enforceable contract, it also calls for retailers to stop doing business with any factory that refuses to make necessary safety improvements, and for workers and their unions to have a substantial voice in factory safety.

    PVH, the parent company of Calvin Klein, Tommy Hilfiger and Izod, also said it would sign on, an expanded version of an earlier proposal that PVH was one of two companies to sign. The new plan lasts five years, the previous one two years.

    Ever since the collapse of the Rana Plaza building on April 24 on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital, H&M, Wal-Mart, Gap and other companies have faced intense pressure to sign the agreement. Until Monday, only PVH and Tchibo, a German retailer, had.

    In announcing its move, H&M said that “in order to make an impact and be sustainable,” the agreement “would need a broad coalition of brands.” A company statement said the agreement committed a company to the goal of a safe and sustainable garment industry in Bangladesh “in which no worker needs to fear fires, building collapses or other accidents that could be prevented with reasonable health and safety measures.”

    “Fire and building safety are extremely important issues for us and we put a lot of effort and resources within this area,” said Helena Helmersson, head of sustainability at the retailer. “With this commitment we can now influence even more in this issue. We hope for a broad coalition of signatures in order for the agreement to work effectively on ground.”

    H&M and Gap were the target of an online petition that obtained more than 900,000 signatures and was sponsored by Avaaz, a human rights group. The petition said, “Your companies and other multinationals profit from cheap labor, and can do much more to reduce the dangers of the places where your products are made.”

    “H&M’s decision to sign the accord is crucial,” said Scott Nova, executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium, a Washington-based factory monitoring group backed by 175 American colleges and universities. “They are the single largest producer of apparel in Bangladesh, ahead even of Wal-Mart. This accord now has tremendous momentum.”

    PVH also said on Monday that it would contribute $2.5 million to underwrite factory safety improvements as part of the new plan.

    Gap has resisted signing on, objecting to its legally binding nature and saying it was already doing a lot on its own, having hired a fire inspector and promised $22 million in loans for factory improvements.

    Bangladeshi labor groups that have sifted through the Rana Plaza rubble have not found any evidence that H&M or Gap had garments made at any of the five factories in the building.

    But numerous investor, religious, consumer and labor groups are pressing other companies known to have obtained apparel from the factories there – Benetton, Cato Fashions, the Children’s Place, el Corte Ingles, Loblaws and Primark – to sign on to the safety plan. Primark, which had acknowledged that one of its suppliers had occupied the second floor of the eight-story building, had already pledged to compensate victims who worked for its supplier and their families.

    Bangladesh is the world’s second-largest apparel exporter, after China, and also has the lowest minimum wage in the world — $37 a month. Its low wages and lack of regulation have helped it attract billions of dollars in orders from Western retailers and apparel brands.

    On Sunday, the Bangladeshi textiles minister, Abdul Latif Siddiky, said the government planned to raise the minimum wage for the nation’s more than three million garment workers.

    Over the last week, H&M was in intense negotiations on the plan with officials from IndustriALL Global Union, a federation of 50 million workers from 140 countries and from UNI Global Union, a federation of 20 million service sector workers.

    In a meeting sponsored by the German government that H&M, Wal-Mart and other retailers held with IndustriALL and other labor and nongovernment organizations two weeks ago, IndustriALL set a deadline of this Wednesday for retailers to sign on to what has often been called the PVH-Tchibo plan.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/14/business/global/hm-agrees-to-bangladesh-safety-plan.html?_r=0

GRAFFITI

In Uncategorized on May 14, 2013 at 3:35 am

BEROK GRAFFITI BARCELONA 2007 SPAIN

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_HdDDfIjhfs

airbrushed graffiti name

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l59fB51Pry8

Graffiti Bombing – “NEXT” D.O.C . 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CEDkvdm7FY