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Archive for November, 2012|Monthly archive page

Sexy Bikers

In Uncategorized on November 29, 2012 at 5:52 am

An Apple a day

In Uncategorized on November 29, 2012 at 5:22 am

New Zealand Awaits Hobbit Premiere in Wellington

In Uncategorized on November 28, 2012 at 4:49 am

New Zealand Awaits Hobbit Premiere in Wellington

Wellington expects crowds of up to 100,000 for the premiere

Hobbit mania erupted in New Zealand’s capital ahead of the world premiere of Peter Jackson’s new trilogy.

The first of the three movies – prequels to the Lord of the Rings trilogy – will be shown at Wellington’s Embassy Theatre on Wednesday evening.

Stars have flown in for the event, which has seen Wellington rebranded as “the Middle of Middle Earth”.

Ahead of the screening, thousands of fans – some in costume – had gathered around the theatre.

Some camped overnight to secure spots close to the 500m-long red carpet that leads to the theatre – now decorated to look like the entrance to a Hobbit house.

‘Never perfect’

“The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey” is the first film of the trilogy, which altogether cost US$500m (£312m) to make and was filmed in New Zealand. The second film is set for release in December 2013 and the third in July 2014.

Ahead of the screening, Oscar-winning director Peter Jackson said he was nervous about the film’s reception.

“Nothing’s ever perfect and it never will be; it’s a real mistake if you say we’re stopping now because we’ve made the perfect film,” he told Radio New Zealand. “You never have and you never will.”

Wellington City Council has put months of planning and just over NZ$1m ($820,000; £512,000) into preparations for the premiere, Radio New Zealand reported, as have tourism officials looking to boost visitor numbers.

Tony Everitt, Asia manager for Tourism New Zealand, told the BBC he expected tourism revenue to rise by as much as US$400m annually because of the films.

The trilogy has taken more than five years to film and hit a number of obstacles. Filming was delayed for months over funding problems and a row over actors’ wages – at one point studio executives suggested moving filming to Britain.

Earlier this week, Jackson also rejected claims from animal rights group Peta that up to 27 animals had died during filming, saying no animals were harmed.

In Wellington, however, crowds appeared set for a party. Up to 100,000 people are expected to gather for the premiere.

Source:BBC News

Obama Goes Joy Riding Khmer Rouge ‘Killing Fields’; Never Mind Gaza ‘Killing Fields’

In Uncategorized on November 28, 2012 at 4:45 am

Obama Goes Joy Riding Khmer Rouge ‘Killing Fields’; Never Mind Gaza ‘Killing Fields’

U.S. President Barack Obama, center, stands with Cambodia’s Prime Minister Hun Sen, right, and Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung during a family photo session of the East Asia Summit at the Peace Palace in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Monday, Nov. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Making history twice within hours, President Barack Obama on Monday became the first U.S. president to set foot in Cambodia, a country once known for its Khmer Rouge “killing fields.” He left behind flag-waving crowds on the streets of Myanmar, the once internationally shunned nation now showing democratic promise.

Unlike the visit to Myanmar, where Obama seemed to revel in that nation’s new hope, the White House made clear that Obama is only in Cambodia to attend an East Asia Summit and said the visit should not be seen as an endorsement of Prime Minister Hun Sen and his government.

Indeed, Obama’s arrival in Cambodia lacked the euphoria of his greeting in Myanmar, where tens of thousands of people lined the streets of Yangon to cheer the first American president to visit a country that until recently had long been isolated from the West. “You gave us hope,” Obama declared in Yangon.

In Phnom Penh, small clusters of Cambodians gathered in the streets to watch the motorcade pass by, without any of the outpouring that greeted Obama in Myanmar.

From the airport, Obama headed straight to the Peace Palace for a meeting with Hun Sen that later was described by U.S. officials as a tense encounter dominated by the president voicing concerns about Cambodia’s human rights record. He specifically raised the lack of free and fair elections, the detention of political prisoners and land seizures, officials said.

Deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes said Obama told the prime minister that those issues are “an impediment” to a deeper relationship between the U.S. and Cambodia. Rhodes said Hun Sen defended his country’s record, saying unique circumstances motivate its policies and practices. Still, the prime minister expressed a desire to deepen ties with the U.S., Rhodes said.

Earlier in Myanmar, Obama addressed a national audience from the University of Yangon, offering a “hand of friendship” and a lasting U.S. commitment, yet a warning, too. He said the new civilian government must nurture democracy or watch it, and U.S. support, disappear.

The six-hour stop in Myanmar was the centerpiece of a four-day trip to Southeast Asia that began in Bangkok and ends Tuesday in Cambodia, where Obama will visit with Chinese, Japanese and Southeast Asia leaders in addition to attending the East Asia Summit with regional leaders.

Obama celebrated the history of what he was witnessing in Myanmar – a nation shedding years of military rule, and a relationship between two nations changing fast.

“This remarkable journey has just begun,” he said.

In a notable detour from U.S. policy, the president referred to the nation as Myanmar in his talks with President Thein Sein. That is the name preferred by the former military regime and the new government, rather than Burma, the old name favored by democracy advocates and the U.S. government.

Rhodes said afterward that Obama’s use of Myanmar was “a diplomatic courtesy” that doesn’t change the U.S. position that the country is still Burma.

On his first trip abroad since his re-election earlier this month, Obama’s motorcade sped him to the lakeside home in Yangon of longtime opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. He hugged her and lauded her as a personal inspiration. Suu Kyi spent most of the past 20 years in house detention at her home.

In remarks after their meeting, Suu Kyi echoed Obama’s tone with an admonition of her own, one that could have been directed at her own ruling party as much as to the United States:

“The most difficult time in any transition is when we think that success is in sight,” she said. “Then we have to be very careful that we’re not lured by the mirage of success.”

Rhodes said Obama was moved the visit with Suu Kyi at her home, and was pleased to see on prominent display a stuffed replica of the president’s dog Bo in the house. Obama gave Suu Kyi the stuffed animal when she visited Washington earlier this year.

Crowds swelled at every intersection in Yangon, yelling affectionately for both Obama and his secretary of state, Hillary Rodham Clinton.

“You are the legend hero of our world,” one banner read.

Obama spoke at a university that was once the center of government opposition, and his message was as much a call for Myanmar to continue in its promising steps as it was a tribute to democracy in general. He held up the United States as an example of its triumph and its imperfections.

Coinciding with the president’s visit, the government of Myanmar announced further human rights steps to review prisoner cases and de-escalate conflicts in ethnic regions of the country.

But Obama urged even more, calling for a government where, as he put it, “those in power must accept constraints.”

“The flickers of progress that we have seen must not be extinguished,” Obama said in the address televised to the nation.

Rhodes said the president was moved by the throngs of people who lined the streets to greet him. The president made one unscheduled stop, at the Shwedagon Pagoda. After seeing the pagoda as Air Force One approached Yangon, then seeing the outpouring of support from people who worship the site, Obama personally decided to make the unscheduled stop, Rhodes said.

As Obama arrived in Cambodia, he was dogged by concerns from human rights groups that have cast Hun Sen as a violent authoritarian and voiced apprehension that Obama’s visit will be perceived inside Cambodia as validation of the prime minister’s regime.

Still, many Cambodians credit Hun Sen with helping the country emerge from the horrors of the 1970s Khmer Rouge reign, when systematic genocide by the communist regime left 1.7 million dead. Vietnam invaded and ousted that regime in 1979. By 1985, Hun Sen had become prime minister.

Source:AP

http://pandithnews.com/2012/11/19/obama-goes-joy-riding-khmer-rouge-killing-fields-never-mind-gaza-killing-fields.html

Home in middle of major road but couple won’t budge

In Uncategorized on November 28, 2012 at 4:40 am

Friday, 23 November 2012 15:33
Home in middle of major road but couple won’t budge

An isolated five-floor building is standing in the middle of a new road that will soon be open in Wenling, Zhejiang province, the People’s Daily reported.

A family from Xiazhangyang village insists on living on the isolated building, because they are not satisfied with the relocation compensation offered by the government, the neighbors said, according to the captions of the photos taken on Wednesday.

To guarantee their safety, neighboring rooms next to them are being kept from demolition, though the neighbors all moved out. The road, which leads to the Wenling Railway Station, hasn’t been put into use yet.

-China Daily/Asia News Network

Places I have been

In Uncategorized on November 28, 2012 at 4:10 am

Places I have been

I have been in many places, but I’ve never been in Cahoots. Apparently, you can’t go alone. You have to be in Cahoots with someone.

I’ve also never been in Cognito. I hear no one recognizes you there.

I have, however, been in Sane. They don’t have an airport; you have to be driven there.

I have made several trips there, thanks to my friends, family and work. I live close so it’s a short drive.

I would like to go to Conclusions, but you have to jump, and I’m not too much on physical activity anymore.

I have also been in Doubt. That is a sad place to go, and I try not to visit there too often.

I’ve been in Flexible, but only when it was very important to stand firm.

Sometimes I’m in Capable, and I go there more often as I’m getting older.

One of my favorite places to be is in Suspense! It really gets the adrenalin flowing and pumps up the old heart!

At my age I need all the stimuli I can get!

And, sometimes I think I am in Vincible but life shows me I am not.

People keep telling me I’m in Denial, but I’m positive I’ve never been there before!

I have been in Deepshit many times; the older I get, the easier it is to get there.

I actually kind of enjoy it there.

So far, I haven’t been in Continent; but my travel agent says I’ll be going soon.

Harley Davidson facts

In Uncategorized on November 20, 2012 at 6:15 am

Harley Davidson facts

Harley-Davidson Facts

The inventor of the Harley-Davidson motorcycle, Arthur Davidson, died and went to heaven.

At the gates, St. Peter told Arthur, ‘Since you’ve been such a good man and your motorcycles have changed the world, your reward is that you can hang out with anyone you want to in heaven.’

Arthur thought about it for a minute and then said, ‘I want to hang out with God.’

St. Peter took Arthur to the Throne Room, and introduced him to God.

God recognized Arthur and commented, ‘Okay, so you were the one who invented the Harley-Davidson motorcycle?’

Arthur said, ‘Yeah, that’s me…’

God commented: ‘Well, what’s the big deal in inventing something that’s pretty unstable, makes noise and pollution and can’t run without a road?’

Arthur was a bit embarrassed, but finally spoke, ‘Excuse me, but aren’t you the inventor of woman?’

God said, ‘Ah, yes.’

‘Well,’ said Arthur, ‘professional to professional, you have some major design flaws in your invention! For example,

1. There’s too much inconsistency in the front-end suspension

2. It chatters constantly at high speeds.

3. Most rear ends are too soft and wobble about too much.

4. The intake is placed way too close to the exhaust.

5. The maintenance costs are outrageous!!!!

‘Hmmmmm, you may have some good points there,’ replied God, ‘hold on.’

God went to his Celestial supercomputer, typed in a few words and waited for the results.

The computer printed out a slip of paper and God read it.

‘Well, it may be true that my invention is flawed,’ God said to Arthur, ‘but according to these numbers, more men are riding my invention than yours’.